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Nevada traffic violation and citation questions  

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  • Can I be stopped for questioning?
    You have the right to ask why you have been stopped.Be respectful, however, or you could help give the police a reason to detain you. You have the right to refuse to answer questions other than providing simple information to identify yourself.The police may pat-down your clothing if they suspect you are carrying a concealed weapon, but you have the right to refuse any additional search.You should not physically resist a search.If the police will not allow you to leave after a sufficient time has passed for them to investigate you, you have the right to ask if you are under arrest and why. Even if you believe that you are being held unlawfully, it is better not to try to escape or physically resist. Usually, this will only get you into more trouble.

  • What if I am stopped in my car?
    You have the right to ask why you have been stopped. You must show your driveršs license and registration upon request. If you are given a ticket, you have the right not to sign it, but you can be arrested if you do not sign it. Generally, there is no good reason to refuse to sign the ticket. You can fight the ticket later in court. The police may set up systemic road blocks to check the driveršs license, vehicle registration and sobriety of all oncoming drivers. Individual officers may not at their own discretion make random stops to check driver's license and vehicle registration, unless they have a clear suspicion that the motorist does not possess a valid license or a car is not registered.

  • Can the police search my car?
    You have the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures. Generally, police need a search warrant to search you or your belongings. Sometimes, police can search without a warrant. These situations include when:

    1. You give your consent to be searched. You do not have to consent to a search. Consenting to a search can make it legal. You may tell the police politely and clearly that you object to their searching.
    2. The police have probable cause. Probable cause means that the police must have trustworthy information that would lead a reasonable person to think it is probable that the search will uncover evidence of a crime or contraband.
    3. Police conduct a search of the person and the areas within that personšs immediate control, including throughout the passenger compartment of a car, following a valid arrest.
    4. Search is motivated by an emergency situation (e.g., to avoid destruction of evidence). Your car can be searched without a warrant so long as: the police have probable cause; or the search takes place after a valid arrest; or the driver is arrested and both driver and car are taken to the police station. The police can seize any objects appearing to be weapons or anything in plain view, even if it is inside your car or home.

  • Is there a way to speed without getting caught?
    First, speed limits were set so our city streets, county roads, and state highways would be safe for all concerned. You should always give yourself plenty of time to reach your destination. If you still plan on speeding, then we suggest you don't drive more than 10 to 15 mph over the posted speed limit. Speed up when you have a open view of the road ahead. Try to keep a speeding car ahead of you, they will be detected first. Most police departments keep pretty consistent shifts. Most shifts change at 7 AM, 3 PM, 11 PM. It is a good bet, that there will be 30 minute window (15 minutes before, and 15 minutes after) around those times when officers will be less likely to be writing tickets. Just don't bet your driving record on it.

  • Why are police cars seen speeding without their lights and sirens on, aren't they also required to follow the speed limits?
    Yes, police are required to follow posted speed limits, except when in pursuit or responding to an emergency. A lot of times (and I would like to think most of the time) the officer is trying to get to a serious call but is prohibited by departmental policy to "run hot". Many agencies only allow hot runs to a very select type of call (officer in trouble, rape in progress, robbery in progress, etc) which places the officer in a catch 22 situation. Should he run over the speed limit in an attempt to get there quickly and catch the bad guy or does he drive the speed limit and lose critical, precious moments at the scene? It's best to place yourself in that situation. A loved one is at home alone with someone breaking in or, worse yet, they have been shot. Do you want the officer to drive the speed limit to get there? Now we must admit that there are officers that simply abuse their authority and speed everywhere. This is not condoned and we suggest that if you see this happening, inquire with the on-duty watch commander or call the agency's internal affairs division. If it is legit, leave it alone and let the officer do his/her job. If not, they should be disciplined accordingly.
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